Loading... Please wait...

Chas Parker #79 6-1/4 Wide Custom Jaws with Custom Welded Stand

Hover over image to zoom

  • Image 1
  • Image 2
  • Image 3
  • Image 4
  • Image 5
  • Image 6
  • Image 7
  • Image 8
  • Image 9
  • Image 10
  • Image 11
  • Image 12
  • Image 13
  • Image 14
  • Image 15
  • Image 16
  • Image 17
  • Image 18
  • Image 19
  • Image 20
  • Image 21
  • Image 22
  • Image 23
  • Image 24
  • Image 25
  • Image 26
  • Image 27
  • Image 28
  • Image 29
  • Image 30
  • Image 31
$1,500.00
Shipping:
Calculated at checkout

 Product Description

If you are looking for a large vise to use on a heavy duty stand, then this might be the one. I built it like how I would want one. Total weight is around 480 lbs. with a 30” base, so I am thinking it might be tough to tip over.

 

This one of a kind stand is made from T.I.G. welded 3/8 plate. The top mounting  plate is 1-1/4 inch thick.  I cut a radial pocket around the outer edge for bolts and stuff. I also added two hangers for hammers and things. Just the way I like it.  The stand height with the vise is 40 inches to the top of the jaws. I figured the height by how high my elbows are.  

 

The Chas Parker #79 vise was built in the early 1900’s.  I replaced the 6-1/4 wide jaws with a brand new custom made set.  I changed the design a little by adding a 1/4 inch more height  than the originals.  Having a 2 inch grip will be a good thing. The new jaws measure 2 inches tall x 6-1/4 inches long with a heavy serration cut.  They are hand fit perpendicular to the square slider and parallel to the Static Side, making a large clean grip.  I heat treated the jaws to 54/56 Rockwell, which makes a nice hard surface that will not chip and also keep its shape for years to come.  All original Parker jaws were soft, which made it easy for hand fitting way back when.  Mine are hand fit too, but it took some doing.

 

The Dynamic Support had a crack just like most of the Prentiss Vises have. The crack was not from abuse, but a mistake at the factory.  Parker molded in a steel bar, and this one went too close to the square slider surface.  I repaired the crack by clamping the square slider in a CNC machine and added two 3/8:16 Socket Head Cap Screws. I buried the two screws and plugged the ends.  After preparing the crack for welding, I preheated the square channel and welded the crack with T.I.G.  The welding rod used was Eutectic 224 which is a quality maintenance welding rod. Anything from Eutectic Castolin is quality stuff.  I slowly cooled the casting over time.  It looks ugly, but all scars are.  Let's call it character.

 

I replaced the handle with a new one and made Bronze Ball Ends.  I like using 1144 Cold Formed CRS for the handle material since it is almost unbend-able.  The grain of the steel runs lengthwise, which is what makes this handle material so good. I peened the balls on so they will never come off and T.I.G welded the end with Silicon Bronze Rod to give it a clean bronze look and added strength.  Then I repaired the spring plunger so you can set a tension on the handle.  That way it will not slide down and pinch your fingers.

 

When I rework spindles and handles, I like to tighten up the backlash. I hate turning the handle and nothing moves. This one needed machining to true up the collar area.  The collar should touch everywhere when tightened, but like most Parkers, this one was clamped on the uneven casting. I resurfaced the area under the collar. This created a gap between the spindle meatball end and the Dynamic Jaw support.  To fill the gap, Parker uses steel shims, but I made an Aluminum Bronze washer and added grease grooves, which worked very well. 

 

The nut also needed some work since it damaged the center of the dove tail area.  This damage caused excessive backlash.  I fixed this by cutting a shelf on the nut and making a clamp that is pinned and bolted down with two 3/8;16 cap screws. The reason for the damage was that someone opened the vise where the square slider was inside the Static support , then applied pressure like a hammer strike.  That caused the nut to raise since the rear was not supported, and that chipped out the center section on one side. If the vise had been closed a couple more inches the Static would have supported the pressure.

  

I added pics of this repair.  In my opinion it is stronger then when it came out of the factory. I also cross drilled the nut and added a grease nipple, I had room on this heavy nut to do this and thought it was a great idea.  Just open the vise and give it one shot of grease every 6 months or so.

 

I machined the base flat so the ears were not being clamped down unevenly.  I removed a big portion of the angle that Parker added way back then. The radius I added matches the stands' top plate. Then I bolted it down with hard bolts and leveling washers from McMaster Carr for uneven surfaces.  The casting was too uneven to mount to a steel base.

 

The paint is Satin Leafy Rise from Valspar sprayed over Rust-o-leum Self Etching Primer. The sun baked the paint on for a good week.   I was not crazy about painting this vise but decided to do it so it wouldn't rust. This one is ready for the new owner to put his own scratches and scars on it.

 

Shipping can be done with Fastenal, store to store.  I have shipped and received heavy vises several times with them, and this is the way to go.  I create a wood box and clamp the vise and stand to a pallet. They shuffle it from truck to truck until it ends up in your area.  Fastenal is cheaper than UPS or FedEx, but if you prefer another method, that's fine. 

My guess is $300+ for shipping. This will be an extra charge added later to the listed price of this Heavy Duty Vise and Stand..

 

Specs:

 

Vise Weight with Stand: 480 lbs.

Stand: 300 lbs.  (Could be filled with sand to give it even more weight)

Jaw Width:     6-1/4 inches

Jaw Height:  2 inches

Max Opening:  10 inches (to be safe)

Handle Length:  16 inches

Handle Diameter:  1 inch

 

 Find Similar Products by Category

 Product Reviews

This product hasn't received any reviews yet. Be the first to review this product!

You Recently Viewed...

 

Follow us on

Electronic Check Processing